Monthly Archives: October 2016

8 Ways to Lower Your Risk of Breast Cancer

Lower Your Risk of Breast Cancer

Approximately one out of every eight women will develop invasive breast cancer during her life. While there is no way to completely eliminate your chances of getting cancer, there are some things women can do to decrease their risk:

 

  1. Breastfeed.

    We’ve all heard that “breast is best” for baby, but it has added benefits for mom as well. By breastfeeding your infant, you also decrease your risk for cancer.

  2. Cut back on alcohol intake.

    The American Cancer Society states that women who have two to five drink a day have 1.5 times the risk of developing breast cancer than women who don’t drink at all. Drinking can increase your chances of developing other cancers as well.

  3. Increase your physical activity.

    Evidence shows that regular, moderate exercise can decrease a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer by up to 18 percent.

  4. Keep a healthy weight after menopause.

    Prior to menopause, most of women’s estrogen comes from their ovaries, while a small amount comes from fat tissue. That ratio flips after menopause, enabling a higher concentration of fatty tissue can increase estrogen levels, further raising the risk of breast cancer. Being overweight can also add to insulin levels, which is linked to a higher risk of cancer.

  5. Don’t smoke.

    There’s now evidence that smoking increases the risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women.

  6. Limit hormone therapy.

    It’s common for women to receive hormone therapy in order to control the symptoms of menopause. However, higher doses over long periods of time can increase the risk of breast cancer. The Mayo Clinic recommends that women take the lowest dose possible and ask their doctor to monitor the length of time they are on hormone supplements.

  7. Avoid radiation.

    Computerized tomography and other medical-imaging methods use a large amount of radiation. There are some cases where it is vital to have these tests done, but if a woman is already at a high risk of developing breast cancer, she might want to ask her doctor about alternatives.

  8. Eat a Mediterranean diet.

    Healthy eating is good for you in general, and some of the foods found in Mediterranean diets is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. These include extra-virgin olive oil, fish and nuts.

 

While there is no sure-fire way to completely eliminate your risk, following these steps can possibly reduce your chances of developing this pervasive disease. At Choice Health Management Services, we don’t provide mastectomy products, but we are here to care for the aging population.  If you have any questions about how to transition the care of your aging loved ones to an assisted living facility, contact us today!

4 Tips to Preventing a Fall

Tips to Preventing A Fall

Did you know that every 11 seconds, an Older American is admitted to the hospital due to a fall? It’s the number-one cause of injury for those older than 65, and can lead to hip fractures, traumatic brain injuries and broken bones. Furthermore, it carries a hefty price tag—the CDC estimates that the average cost of treating a fall runs around $30,000.

However, with a few preventative measures, you can cut back on the risk of your loved one experiencing a fall. We would like to share with you the following tips:

  1. Stay active.

    Many Older Americans stop exercising because they experience a decrease in their mobility through sarcopenia, or age-related muscle loss. Low-impact exercise can help restore some mobility, which is key in fall prevention. Many gyms and senior centers also offer balance classes, which can help re-train the muscles responsible for stability.

  2. Consult your doctor about whether your medications put you at risk.

    A study published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information found that drug use among older adults has increased in the past few decades.  That means more Older Americans are experiencing pharmaceutical side-effects that can lead to a fall, such as dizziness and loss of balance.  Some over-the-counter sleep aids are especially notorious for this, so consult your doctor if you have trouble sleeping at night. Sleep disorders can be caused by a number of factors, including sleep apnea.

  3. Practice fall prevention at home.

    Make sure there aren’t any objects on the floor that you can trip on, and that your rooms are well-lit. The bathroom is one of the top culprits when it comes to falls among Older Americans. Equip your home with the proper bath safety products. Things such as bath mats and grab bars can go far in preventing you from taking a tumble.

  4. Have your vision checked regularly.

    As we age, less light enters our retina, making obstacles, tripping hazards and contrasting edges harder to see. If you do wear glasses, make sure that your prescription is up-to-date.  Avoid tint-changing lenses, as these take a while to adjust to your environment and can pose additional tripping hazards.

 

Choice Health Management Services is dedicated to helping residents remain safe and healthy as they age.  Please reach out to us if you have any questions about how we keep our residents safe and healthy!